More than 400 cosmetics possess unwanted ingredients, alert the UFC-Que Choisir

Shampoo, shower gel, face cream, toothpaste, wipes … and sold in pharmacies, always contain “undesirable substances”, according to the UFC-Que Choisir. UFC-Que Choisir now lists nearly 400 cosmetic products containing one or more unwanted ingredients. The consumer association calls on public authorities “to introduce regulatory measures that are more protective for consumers”.

Since the launch of this list in February 2016, it has more than doubled, deplores in a statement the UFC- to choose which has in its line of sight, “eleven substances or families of unwanted substances of concern” including endocrine disruptors such as as BHA or butyl- and propyl-parabens, as well as allergens such as methylisothiazolinone (MIT).

More than 90% of the products blamed in 2016 still contain the same unwanted substances

The presence of these substances is “still as massive,” she laments in a statement. “90% of the products incriminated in 2016 still contain the same undesirable substances, to the detriment of the health of consumers! “

– Colorations –

“Even baby products are not spared,” says the UFC-Que Choisir, regretting for example the presence of phenoxyethanol, a preservative toxic to the liver, in several creams for infants.

More than 400 cosmetics possess unwanted ingredients, alert the UFC-Que Choisir

In its line of fire: “Eleven substances or families of unwanted substances of concern”.

These include endocrine disruptors such as BHA and butylparabens and propylparabens, as well as allergens such as methylisothiazolinone (MIT).

Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are chemicals found in many everyday products that disrupt the hormonal system and can cause disease and abnormalities.

For example, BHA has been found in lip balms or a cream for dry, damaged feet. Butylparaben and propylparaben are present in hair care, wipes, foundation, mascara, shower gel …

Moreover, “major allergens are still very commonly used, foremost among which is the MIT”, although “dermatologists and allergists do not stop to alert about their presence in cosmetics,” laments Olivier Andrault, UFC .

According to the association, methylisothiazolinone (MIT) and methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCIT) are the substances “the most worrying, so much so that these preservatives have just been banned in products not rinsed”.

They are still present in care for feet, hair and shampoos.

In hair dye products, it is associated with p-phenylenediamine, “which further increases the risk of triggering serious allergic reactions,” says the UFC.

“Even baby products are not spared,” says the association. Phenoxyethanol, a toxic preservative for the liver, has been found in many infant creams.

For André Cicolella, from the Réseau Environnement Santé, these results are “not a surprise”. “Cosmetics are a major source of contamination for the population, especially pregnant women and fetuses,” he says.

– “Falsely reassuring” statements –

There are evolutions” in the composition of products “but they are unfortunately too rare, deplores Mr. Andrault, recalling that only 10% of the products incriminated in 2016 by the UFC have seen their composition improved.

In addition, “falsely reassuring mentions flourish on packaging, as + without parabens + or + hypoallergenic +,” he says.

However, the “hypoallergenic” character of a product “is not defined in a standard way by regulation”. And paraben may have been “replaced by other problematic components that are also endocrine disruptors,” says Andrault.

The cosmetics industry uses these unwanted compounds “thanks to a lax regulation”, indignant the UFC.

For endocrine disruptors, for example, “the definition projects proposed by the European Commission require such a high level of proof that, in practice, no substance would be banned,” she regretted.

The EU must again attempt to reach a definition of endocrine disruptors on 28 February.

“The regulations are based on the concepts of the 60s and 70s, not on today’s scientific data,” says Cicolella, convinced that unwanted substances “are easily replaceable”.

The cosmetics industry continues to use them “for a question of technical ease, cost price,” said François Veillerette, the NGO Generations Futures. (source)

Some manufacturers have changed the composition of their products, but “these formula changes are unfortunately all too rare, since one year after our first study, 90% of the products incriminated in 2016 still contain the same undesirable substances”, adds the association . However, “aside from a few rare products in violation of the law, the presence of these undesirable compounds is legal, thanks to a lax regulation,” notes the UFC-Que Choisir.

The association therefore asks “the European public authorities to implement without delay the experts’ recommendations on the withdrawal of substances, to strictly regulate labeling claims (such as” hypoallergenic “or” paraben-free “) and , more generally, to propose a new definition of endocrine disruptors allowing effective removal of these harmful substances “.

Source More than 400 cosmetics possess unwanted ingredients: with AFP

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