Hibiscus: The extract of this plant inhibits obesity and protects the liver

When the petals of the flower fall, the deep red cup-shaped calyx develops and eventually resembles flower buds. They are used to make hibiscus extract and a delicious red hibiscus tea sometimes called Carcadé.

Virtues recognized since the dawn of time

According to the belief, the ancient Egyptian pharaohs drank hibiscus tea to cool off. In Iran, hibiscus tea is used to relieve occasional problems of nervousness and sleep.

Traditionally, it is also used to strengthen the cardiovascular and respiratory system. More recently, research suggests that hibiscus tea has other benefits such as maintaining a healthy weight and much more.

The extract of hibiscus sabdariffa has a potential to regulate metabolic and protective liver. In February 2014, research was published showing that obese people aged 18 to 65 who had consumed hibiscus extract for 12 weeks had some interesting results.

Research has shown that consumption of hibiscus extract improves systemic antioxidant potential and reduces oxidative stress.

There was a reduction in body mass index (BMI), especially in the waist and hips. If that was not impressive enough, hibiscus extract also reduced the level of free fatty acids in the blood that are associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes.

In addition, those who take hibiscus extract have also experienced a decrease in fatty liver, a symptom of fatty liver, which according to researchers should mainly be attributed to the polyphenols it contains. They stated that “this extract may act as an adjunct to prevent obesity and nonalcoholic liver stenosis”.

But the latest study confirms the anti-obesity effects of hibiscus. In 2007, research showed that hibiscus extract significantly reduced weight gain in obese mice.

Additional benefits of hibiscus extract

Hibiscus extract is an important source of polyphenols. They are plant compounds recognized for their prevention of diseases, their antioxidant and anti-aging properties. Research has shown that polyphenols in hibiscus extract induce cell death in human gastric carcinoma cells as well as apoptosis of human leukemia cells.

Research has shown that consumption of hibiscus extract improves systemic antioxidant potential and reduces oxidative stress in study participants. The study also revealed a “high” biotransformation of ingested polyphenols, which suggests that the compounds are in a highly bioavailable form.

Various studies have shown that hibiscus extract can help reduce the formation of kidney stones, protect the liver against chemically induced damage in fish, improve blood pressure and lower blood fat levels in people with the disease. of diabetes.

Hibiscus extract has even shown promise in the prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome with a study concluding that a daily dose of hibiscus extract for one month improves blood glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides and decreases insulin resistance in people with metabolic syndrome.

Hibiscus tea can be even more beneficial than black tea. Research suggests that many of the benefits of tea are largely mediated by its polyphenols. However, green and black teas are getting attention in mainstream health reports. In fact, each type of tea has unique properties because of its special blend of polyphenols, and there are reasons to believe that hibiscus tea can overshadow black tea in this case.

In a similar study, diabetic patients with mild hypertension who drank hibiscus tea saw their blood pressure decrease while black tea users had an increase. If you are a tea drinker, it may be wise to experiment with other types of tea, such as hibiscus tea, preferably organic.

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